external Package

external Package

codewise Module

CodeWise - global code intelligence database

Why this module

  • Exuberant ctags is an excellent code scanner
  • Unfortunately, TAGS file lookup sucks for “find methods of this class”
  • TAGS files can be all around the hard drive. CodeWise database is just one file (by default ~/.codewise.db)
  • I wanted to implement modern code completion for Leo editor
  • codewise.py is usable as a python module, or a command line tool.

Creating ctags data

  1. Make sure you have exuberant ctags (not just regular ctags) installed. It’s an Ubuntu package, so its easy to install if you’re using Ubuntu.

  2. [Optional] Create a custom ~/.ctags file containing default

    configuration settings for ctags. See: http://ctags.sourceforge.net/ctags.html#FILES for more details.

    The codewise setup command (see below), will leave this file alone if it exists; otherwise, codewise setup will create a ~/.ctags file containing:

    --exclude=*.html
    --exclude=*.css
    
  3. Create the ctags data in ~/.codewise.db using this module. Execute the following from a console window:

    codewise setup
        # Optional: creates ~/.ctags if it does not exist.
        # See http://ctags.sourceforge.net/ctags.html#FILES
    codewise init
        # Optional: deletes ~/.codewise.db if it exists.
    codewise parse <path to directory>
        # Adds ctags data to ~/.codewise.db for <directory>
    

Note: On Windows, use a batch file, say codewise.bat, to execute the above code. codewise.bat contains:

python <path to leo>\leo\external\codewise.py %*

Using the autocompleter

After restarting Leo, type, for example, in the body pane:

c.op<ctrl-space>

that is, use use the autocomplete-force command, to find all the c. methods starting with ‘op’ etc.

Theory of operation

  • ~/.codewise.db is an sqlite database with following tables:

CLASS maps class id’s to names.

FILE maps file id’s to file names

DATASOURCE contains places where data has been parsed from, to enable reparse

FUNCTION, the most important one, contains functions/methods, along with CLASS
and FILE it was found in. Additionally, it has SEARCHPATTERN field that can be used to give calltips, or used as a regexp to find the method from file quickly.

You can browse the data by installing sqlitebrovser and doing ‘sqlitebrowser ~/codewise.db’

If you know the class name you want to find the methods for, CodeWise.get_members with a list of classes to match.

If you want to match a function without a class, call CodeWise.get_functions. This can be much slower if you have a huge database.

class leo.external.codewise.CodeWise(dbpath=None)[source]

Bases: object

add_source(type, src)[source]
class_id(classname)[source]

return class id. May create new class

create_caches()[source]

read existing db and create caches

createdb(dbpath)[source]
cursor()[source]
feed_ctags(tagsfile_obj)[source]
feed_function(func_name, class_name, file_name, aux)[source]

insert one function

‘aux’ can be a search pattern (as with ctags), signature, or description

feed_scintilla(apifile_obj)[source]

handle scintilla api files

Syntax is like:

qt.QApplication.style?4() -> QStyle

file_id(fname)[source]
get_functions(prefix=None)[source]
get_members(classnames)[source]
parse(paths)[source]
parseall()[source]
reset_caches()[source]
sources()[source]
zap_symbols()[source]
class leo.external.codewise.ContextSniffer[source]

Bases: object

Class to analyze surrounding context and guess class

For simple dynamic code completion engines

declare(var, klass)[source]
push_declarations(body)[source]
set_small_context(body)[source]

Set immediate function

leo.external.codewise.callers(n=4, count=0, excludeCaller=True, files=False)[source]

Return a list containing the callers of the function that called g.callerList.

If the excludeCaller keyword is True (the default), g.callers is not on the list.

If the files keyword argument is True, filenames are included in the list.

leo.external.codewise.choose(cond, a, b)[source]
leo.external.codewise.cmd_functions(args)[source]
leo.external.codewise.cmd_init(args)[source]
leo.external.codewise.cmd_members(args)[source]
leo.external.codewise.cmd_parse(args)[source]
leo.external.codewise.cmd_parseall(args)[source]
leo.external.codewise.cmd_scintilla(args)[source]
leo.external.codewise.cmd_setup(args)[source]
leo.external.codewise.cmd_tags(args)[source]
leo.external.codewise.doKeywordArgs(keys, d=None)[source]

Return a result dict that is a copy of the keys dict with missing items replaced by defaults in d dict.

leo.external.codewise.get_module()[source]
leo.external.codewise.isBytes(s)[source]

Return True if s is Python3k bytes type.

leo.external.codewise.isCallable(obj)[source]
leo.external.codewise.isString(s)[source]

Return True if s is any string, but not bytes.

leo.external.codewise.isUnicode(s)[source]

Return True if s is a unicode string.

leo.external.codewise.isValidEncoding(encoding)[source]
leo.external.codewise.main()[source]
leo.external.codewise.pdb(message='')[source]

Fall into pdb.

leo.external.codewise.pr(*args, **keys)[source]

Print all non-keyword args, and put them to the log pane. The first, third, fifth, etc. arg translated by g.translateString. Supports color, comma, newline, spaces and tabName keyword arguments.

leo.external.codewise.printlines(lines)[source]
leo.external.codewise.run_ctags(paths)[source]
leo.external.codewise.test(self)[source]
leo.external.codewise.toEncodedString(s, encoding='utf-8', reportErrors=False)[source]

Convert unicode string to an encoded string.

leo.external.codewise.toUnicode(s, encoding='utf-8', reportErrors=False)[source]

Connvert a non-unicode string with the given encoding to unicode.

leo.external.codewise.trace(*args, **keys)[source]
leo.external.codewise.translateArgs(args, d)[source]

Return the concatenation of all args, with odd args translated.

leo.external.codewise.u(s)[source]
leo.external.codewise.ue(s, encoding)[source]

edb Module

edb: The Python Debugger Pdb, modified for blender by EKR

To use the debugger in its simplest form:

>>> import pdb
>>> pdb.run('<a statement>')

The debugger’s prompt is ‘(Pdb) ‘. This will stop in the first function call in <a statement>.

Alternatively, if a statement terminated with an unhandled exception, you can use pdb’s post-mortem facility to inspect the contents of the traceback:

>>> <a statement>
<exception traceback>
>>> import pdb
>>> pdb.pm()

The commands recognized by the debugger are listed in the next section. Most can be abbreviated as indicated; e.g., h(elp) means that ‘help’ can be typed as ‘h’ or ‘help’ (but not as ‘he’ or ‘hel’, nor as ‘H’ or ‘Help’ or ‘HELP’). Optional arguments are enclosed in square brackets. Alternatives in the command syntax are separated by a vertical bar (|).

A blank line repeats the previous command literally, except for ‘list’, where it lists the next 11 lines.

Commands that the debugger doesn’t recognize are assumed to be Python statements and are executed in the context of the program being debugged. Python statements can also be prefixed with an exclamation point (‘!’). This is a powerful way to inspect the program being debugged; it is even possible to change variables or call functions. When an exception occurs in such a statement, the exception name is printed but the debugger’s state is not changed.

The debugger supports aliases, which can save typing. And aliases can have parameters (see the alias help entry) which allows one a certain level of adaptability to the context under examination.

Multiple commands may be entered on a single line, separated by the pair ‘;;’. No intelligence is applied to separating the commands; the input is split at the first ‘;;’, even if it is in the middle of a quoted string.

If a file ”.pdbrc” exists in your home directory or in the current directory, it is read in and executed as if it had been typed at the debugger prompt. This is particularly useful for aliases. If both files exist, the one in the home directory is read first and aliases defined there can be overriden by the local file.

Aside from aliases, the debugger is not directly programmable; but it is implemented as a class from which you can derive your own debugger class, which you can make as fancy as you like.

Debugger commands

h(elp)
Without argument, print the list of available commands. With a command name as argument, print help about that command. “help pdb” shows the full pdb documentation. “help exec” gives help on the ! command.
w(here)
Print a stack trace, with the most recent frame at the bottom. An arrow indicates the “current frame”, which determines the context of most commands. ‘bt’ is an alias for this command.
d(own) [count]
Move the current frame count (default one) levels down in the stack trace (to a newer frame).
u(p) [count]
Move the current frame count (default one) levels up in the stack trace (to an older frame).
b(reak) [ ([filename:]lineno | function) [, condition] ]

Without argument, list all breaks.

With a line number argument, set a break at this line in the current file. With a function name, set a break at the first executable line of that function. If a second argument is present, it is a string specifying an expression which must evaluate to true before the breakpoint is honored.

The line number may be prefixed with a filename and a colon, to specify a breakpoint in another file (probably one that hasn’t been loaded yet). The file is searched for on sys.path; the .py suffix may be omitted.

tbreak [ ([filename:]lineno | function) [, condition] ]
Same arguments as break, but sets a temporary breakpoint: it is automatically deleted when first hit.

cl(ear) filename:lineno cl(ear) [bpnumber [bpnumber...]]

With a space separated list of breakpoint numbers, clear those breakpoints. Without argument, clear all breaks (but first ask confirmation). With a filename:lineno argument, clear all breaks at that line in that file.
disable bpnumber [bpnumber ...]
Disables the breakpoints given as a space separated list of breakpoint numbers. Disabling a breakpoint means it cannot cause the program to stop execution, but unlike clearing a breakpoint, it remains in the list of breakpoints and can be (re-)enabled.
enable bpnumber [bpnumber ...]
Enables the breakpoints given as a space separated list of breakpoint numbers.
ignore bpnumber [count]
Set the ignore count for the given breakpoint number. If count is omitted, the ignore count is set to 0. A breakpoint becomes active when the ignore count is zero. When non-zero, the count is decremented each time the breakpoint is reached and the breakpoint is not disabled and any associated condition evaluates to true.
condition bpnumber [condition]
Set a new condition for the breakpoint, an expression which must evaluate to true before the breakpoint is honored. If condition is absent, any existing condition is removed; i.e., the breakpoint is made unconditional.
commands [bpnumber]

(com) ... (com) end (Pdb)

Specify a list of commands for breakpoint number bpnumber. The commands themselves are entered on the following lines. Type a line containing just ‘end’ to terminate the commands. The commands are executed when the breakpoint is hit.

To remove all commands from a breakpoint, type commands and follow it immediately with end; that is, give no commands.

With no bpnumber argument, commands refers to the last breakpoint set.

You can use breakpoint commands to start your program up again. Simply use the continue command, or step, or any other command that resumes execution.

Specifying any command resuming execution (currently continue, step, next, return, jump, quit and their abbreviations) terminates the command list (as if that command was immediately followed by end). This is because any time you resume execution (even with a simple next or step), you may encounter another breakpoint – which could have its own command list, leading to ambiguities about which list to execute.

If you use the ‘silent’ command in the command list, the usual message about stopping at a breakpoint is not printed. This may be desirable for breakpoints that are to print a specific message and then continue. If none of the other commands print anything, you will see no sign that the breakpoint was reached.

s(tep)
Execute the current line, stop at the first possible occasion (either in a function that is called or in the current function).
n(ext)
Continue execution until the next line in the current function is reached or it returns.
unt(il) [lineno]
Without argument, continue execution until the line with a number greater than the current one is reached. With a line number, continue execution until a line with a number greater or equal to that is reached. In both cases, also stop when the current frame returns.
j(ump) lineno

Set the next line that will be executed. Only available in the bottom-most frame. This lets you jump back and execute code again, or jump forward to skip code that you don’t want to run.

It should be noted that not all jumps are allowed – for instance it is not possible to jump into the middle of a for loop or out of a finally clause.

r(eturn)
Continue execution until the current function returns.
retval
Print the return value for the last return of a function.
run [args...]
Restart the debugged python program. If a string is supplied it is splitted with “shlex”, and the result is used as the new sys.argv. History, breakpoints, actions and debugger options are preserved. “restart” is an alias for “run”.
c(ont(inue))
Continue execution, only stop when a breakpoint is encountered.

l(ist) [first [,last] | .]

List source code for the current file. Without arguments, list 11 lines around the current line or continue the previous listing. With . as argument, list 11 lines around the current line. With one argument, list 11 lines starting at that line. With two arguments, list the given range; if the second argument is less than the first, it is a count.

The current line in the current frame is indicated by “->”. If an exception is being debugged, the line where the exception was originally raised or propagated is indicated by “>>”, if it differs from the current line.

longlist | ll
List the whole source code for the current function or frame.
a(rgs)
Print the argument list of the current function.
p(rint) expression
Print the value of the expression.
pp expression
Pretty-print the value of the expression.
whatis arg
Print the type of the argument.
source expression
Try to get source code for the given object and display it.

display [expression]

Display the value of the expression if it changed, each time execution stops in the current frame.

Without expression, list all display expressions for the current frame.

undisplay [expression]

Do not display the expression any more in the current frame.

Without expression, clear all display expressions for the current frame.

interact

Start an interative interpreter whose global namespace contains all the (global and local) names found in the current scope.
alias [name [command [parameter parameter ...] ]]

Create an alias called ‘name’ that executes ‘command’. The command must not be enclosed in quotes. Replaceable parameters can be indicated by %1, %2, and so on, while %* is replaced by all the parameters. If no command is given, the current alias for name is shown. If no name is given, all aliases are listed.

Aliases may be nested and can contain anything that can be legally typed at the pdb prompt. Note! You can override internal pdb commands with aliases! Those internal commands are then hidden until the alias is removed. Aliasing is recursively applied to the first word of the command line; all other words in the line are left alone.

As an example, here are two useful aliases (especially when placed in the .pdbrc file):

# Print instance variables (usage “pi classInst”) alias pi for k in %1.__dict__.keys(): print “%1.”,k,”=”,%1.__dict__[k] # Print instance variables in self alias ps pi self

unalias name
Delete the specified alias.
debug code
Enter a recursive debugger that steps through the code argument (which is an arbitrary expression or statement to be executed in the current environment).

q(uit) exit

Quit from the debugger. The program being executed is aborted.
(!) statement
Execute the (one-line) statement in the context of the current stack frame. The exclamation point can be omitted unless the first word of the statement resembles a debugger command. To assign to a global variable you must always prefix the command with a ‘global’ command, e.g.: (Pdb) global list_options; list_options = [‘-l’] (Pdb)
leo.external.edb.run(statement, globals=None, locals=None)[source]
leo.external.edb.pm()[source]
class leo.external.edb.Pdb(completekey='tab', stdin=None, stdout=None, skip=None, nosigint=False)[source]

Bases: bdb.Bdb, cmd.Cmd

bp_commands(frame)[source]

Call every command that was set for the current active breakpoint (if there is one).

Returns True if the normal interaction function must be called, False otherwise.

break_here(frame)[source]
checkline(filename, lineno)[source]

Check whether specified line seems to be executable.

Return lineno if it is, 0 if not (e.g. a docstring, comment, blank line or EOF). Warning: testing is not comprehensive.

commands_resuming = ['do_continue', 'do_step', 'do_next', 'do_return', 'do_quit', 'do_jump']
default(line)[source]
defaultFile()[source]

Produce a reasonable default.

displayhook(obj)[source]

Custom displayhook for the exec in default(), which prevents assignment of the _ variable in the builtins.

do_EOF(arg)[source]

EOF Handles the receipt of EOF as a command.

do_a(arg)

a(rgs) Print the argument list of the current function.

do_alias(arg)[source]

alias [name [command [parameter parameter ...] ]] Create an alias called ‘name’ that executes ‘command’. The command must not be enclosed in quotes. Replaceable parameters can be indicated by %1, %2, and so on, while %* is replaced by all the parameters. If no command is given, the current alias for name is shown. If no name is given, all aliases are listed.

Aliases may be nested and can contain anything that can be legally typed at the pdb prompt. Note! You can override internal pdb commands with aliases! Those internal commands are then hidden until the alias is removed. Aliasing is recursively applied to the first word of the command line; all other words in the line are left alone.

As an example, here are two useful aliases (especially when placed in the .pdbrc file):

# Print instance variables (usage “pi classInst”) alias pi for k in %1.__dict__.keys(): print “%1.”,k,”=”,%1.__dict__[k] # Print instance variables in self alias ps pi self

do_args(arg)[source]

a(rgs) Print the argument list of the current function.

do_b(arg, temporary=0)

b(reak) [ ([filename:]lineno | function) [, condition] ] Without argument, list all breaks.

With a line number argument, set a break at this line in the current file. With a function name, set a break at the first executable line of that function. If a second argument is present, it is a string specifying an expression which must evaluate to true before the breakpoint is honored.

The line number may be prefixed with a filename and a colon, to specify a breakpoint in another file (probably one that hasn’t been loaded yet). The file is searched for on sys.path; the .py suffix may be omitted.

do_break(arg, temporary=0)[source]

b(reak) [ ([filename:]lineno | function) [, condition] ] Without argument, list all breaks.

With a line number argument, set a break at this line in the current file. With a function name, set a break at the first executable line of that function. If a second argument is present, it is a string specifying an expression which must evaluate to true before the breakpoint is honored.

The line number may be prefixed with a filename and a colon, to specify a breakpoint in another file (probably one that hasn’t been loaded yet). The file is searched for on sys.path; the .py suffix may be omitted.

do_bt(arg)

w(here) Print a stack trace, with the most recent frame at the bottom. An arrow indicates the “current frame”, which determines the context of most commands. ‘bt’ is an alias for this command.

do_c(arg)

c(ont(inue)) Continue execution, only stop when a breakpoint is encountered.

do_cl(arg)

cl(ear) filename:lineno cl(ear) [bpnumber [bpnumber...]]

With a space separated list of breakpoint numbers, clear those breakpoints. Without argument, clear all breaks (but first ask confirmation). With a filename:lineno argument, clear all breaks at that line in that file.
do_clear(arg)[source]

cl(ear) filename:lineno cl(ear) [bpnumber [bpnumber...]]

With a space separated list of breakpoint numbers, clear those breakpoints. Without argument, clear all breaks (but first ask confirmation). With a filename:lineno argument, clear all breaks at that line in that file.
do_commands(arg)[source]

commands [bpnumber] (com) ... (com) end (Pdb)

Specify a list of commands for breakpoint number bpnumber. The commands themselves are entered on the following lines. Type a line containing just ‘end’ to terminate the commands. The commands are executed when the breakpoint is hit.

To remove all commands from a breakpoint, type commands and follow it immediately with end; that is, give no commands.

With no bpnumber argument, commands refers to the last breakpoint set.

You can use breakpoint commands to start your program up again. Simply use the continue command, or step, or any other command that resumes execution.

Specifying any command resuming execution (currently continue, step, next, return, jump, quit and their abbreviations) terminates the command list (as if that command was immediately followed by end). This is because any time you resume execution (even with a simple next or step), you may encounter another breakpoint – which could have its own command list, leading to ambiguities about which list to execute.

If you use the ‘silent’ command in the command list, the usual message about stopping at a breakpoint is not printed. This may be desirable for breakpoints that are to print a specific message and then continue. If none of the other commands print anything, you will see no sign that the breakpoint was reached.

do_condition(arg)[source]

condition bpnumber [condition] Set a new condition for the breakpoint, an expression which must evaluate to true before the breakpoint is honored. If condition is absent, any existing condition is removed; i.e., the breakpoint is made unconditional.

do_cont(arg)

c(ont(inue)) Continue execution, only stop when a breakpoint is encountered.

do_continue(arg)[source]

c(ont(inue)) Continue execution, only stop when a breakpoint is encountered.

do_d(arg)

d(own) [count] Move the current frame count (default one) levels down in the stack trace (to a newer frame).

do_debug(arg)[source]

debug code Enter a recursive debugger that steps through the code argument (which is an arbitrary expression or statement to be executed in the current environment).

do_disable(arg)[source]

disable bpnumber [bpnumber ...] Disables the breakpoints given as a space separated list of breakpoint numbers. Disabling a breakpoint means it cannot cause the program to stop execution, but unlike clearing a breakpoint, it remains in the list of breakpoints and can be (re-)enabled.

do_display(arg)[source]

display [expression]

Display the value of the expression if it changed, each time execution stops in the current frame.

Without expression, list all display expressions for the current frame.

do_down(arg)[source]

d(own) [count] Move the current frame count (default one) levels down in the stack trace (to a newer frame).

do_enable(arg)[source]

enable bpnumber [bpnumber ...] Enables the breakpoints given as a space separated list of breakpoint numbers.

do_exit(arg)

q(uit) exit

Quit from the debugger. The program being executed is aborted.
do_h(arg)

h(elp) Without argument, print the list of available commands. With a command name as argument, print help about that command. “help pdb” shows the full pdb documentation. “help exec” gives help on the ! command.

do_help(arg)[source]

h(elp) Without argument, print the list of available commands. With a command name as argument, print help about that command. “help pdb” shows the full pdb documentation. “help exec” gives help on the ! command.

do_ignore(arg)[source]

ignore bpnumber [count] Set the ignore count for the given breakpoint number. If count is omitted, the ignore count is set to 0. A breakpoint becomes active when the ignore count is zero. When non-zero, the count is decremented each time the breakpoint is reached and the breakpoint is not disabled and any associated condition evaluates to true.

do_interact(arg)[source]

interact

Start an interative interpreter whose global namespace contains all the (global and local) names found in the current scope.

do_j(arg)

j(ump) lineno Set the next line that will be executed. Only available in the bottom-most frame. This lets you jump back and execute code again, or jump forward to skip code that you don’t want to run.

It should be noted that not all jumps are allowed – for instance it is not possible to jump into the middle of a for loop or out of a finally clause.

do_jump(arg)[source]

j(ump) lineno Set the next line that will be executed. Only available in the bottom-most frame. This lets you jump back and execute code again, or jump forward to skip code that you don’t want to run.

It should be noted that not all jumps are allowed – for instance it is not possible to jump into the middle of a for loop or out of a finally clause.

do_l(arg)

l(ist) [first [,last] | .]

List source code for the current file. Without arguments, list 11 lines around the current line or continue the previous listing. With . as argument, list 11 lines around the current line. With one argument, list 11 lines starting at that line. With two arguments, list the given range; if the second argument is less than the first, it is a count.

The current line in the current frame is indicated by “->”. If an exception is being debugged, the line where the exception was originally raised or propagated is indicated by “>>”, if it differs from the current line.

do_list(arg)[source]

l(ist) [first [,last] | .]

List source code for the current file. Without arguments, list 11 lines around the current line or continue the previous listing. With . as argument, list 11 lines around the current line. With one argument, list 11 lines starting at that line. With two arguments, list the given range; if the second argument is less than the first, it is a count.

The current line in the current frame is indicated by “->”. If an exception is being debugged, the line where the exception was originally raised or propagated is indicated by “>>”, if it differs from the current line.

do_ll(arg)

longlist | ll List the whole source code for the current function or frame.

do_longlist(arg)[source]

longlist | ll List the whole source code for the current function or frame.

do_n(arg)

n(ext) Continue execution until the next line in the current function is reached or it returns.

do_next(arg)[source]

n(ext) Continue execution until the next line in the current function is reached or it returns.

do_p(arg)[source]

p(rint) expression Print the value of the expression.

do_pp(arg)[source]

pp expression Pretty-print the value of the expression.

do_print(arg)

p(rint) expression Print the value of the expression.

do_q(arg)

q(uit) exit

Quit from the debugger. The program being executed is aborted.
do_quit(arg)[source]

q(uit) exit

Quit from the debugger. The program being executed is aborted.
do_r(arg)

r(eturn) Continue execution until the current function returns.

do_restart(arg)

run [args...] Restart the debugged python program. If a string is supplied it is splitted with “shlex”, and the result is used as the new sys.argv. History, breakpoints, actions and debugger options are preserved. “restart” is an alias for “run”.

do_return(arg)[source]

r(eturn) Continue execution until the current function returns.

do_retval(arg)[source]

retval Print the return value for the last return of a function.

do_run(arg)[source]

run [args...] Restart the debugged python program. If a string is supplied it is splitted with “shlex”, and the result is used as the new sys.argv. History, breakpoints, actions and debugger options are preserved. “restart” is an alias for “run”.

do_rv(arg)

retval Print the return value for the last return of a function.

do_s(arg)

s(tep) Execute the current line, stop at the first possible occasion (either in a function that is called or in the current function).

do_source(arg)[source]

source expression Try to get source code for the given object and display it.

do_step(arg)[source]

s(tep) Execute the current line, stop at the first possible occasion (either in a function that is called or in the current function).

do_tbreak(arg)[source]

tbreak [ ([filename:]lineno | function) [, condition] ] Same arguments as break, but sets a temporary breakpoint: it is automatically deleted when first hit.

do_u(arg)

u(p) [count] Move the current frame count (default one) levels up in the stack trace (to an older frame).

do_unalias(arg)[source]

unalias name Delete the specified alias.

do_undisplay(arg)[source]

undisplay [expression]

Do not display the expression any more in the current frame.

Without expression, clear all display expressions for the current frame.

do_unt(arg)

unt(il) [lineno] Without argument, continue execution until the line with a number greater than the current one is reached. With a line number, continue execution until a line with a number greater or equal to that is reached. In both cases, also stop when the current frame returns.

do_until(arg)[source]

unt(il) [lineno] Without argument, continue execution until the line with a number greater than the current one is reached. With a line number, continue execution until a line with a number greater or equal to that is reached. In both cases, also stop when the current frame returns.

do_up(arg)[source]

u(p) [count] Move the current frame count (default one) levels up in the stack trace (to an older frame).

do_w(arg)

w(here) Print a stack trace, with the most recent frame at the bottom. An arrow indicates the “current frame”, which determines the context of most commands. ‘bt’ is an alias for this command.

do_whatis(arg)[source]

whatis arg Print the type of the argument.

do_where(arg)[source]

w(here) Print a stack trace, with the most recent frame at the bottom. An arrow indicates the “current frame”, which determines the context of most commands. ‘bt’ is an alias for this command.

error(msg)[source]
execRcLines()[source]
forget()[source]
format_stack_entry(frame_lineno, lprefix=': ')[source]
handle_command_def(line)[source]

Handles one command line during command list definition.

help_exec()[source]

(!) statement Execute the (one-line) statement in the context of the current stack frame. The exclamation point can be omitted unless the first word of the statement resembles a debugger command. To assign to a global variable you must always prefix the command with a ‘global’ command, e.g.: (Pdb) global list_options; list_options = [‘-l’] (Pdb)

help_pdb()[source]
interaction(frame, traceback)[source]
lineinfo(identifier)[source]
lookupmodule(filename)[source]

Helper function for break/clear parsing – may be overridden.

lookupmodule() translates (possibly incomplete) file or module name into an absolute file name.

message(msg)[source]
onecmd(line)[source]

Interpret the argument as though it had been typed in response to the prompt.

Checks whether this line is typed at the normal prompt or in a breakpoint command list definition.

precmd(line)[source]

Handle alias expansion and ‘;;’ separator.

preloop()[source]
print_stack_entry(frame_lineno, prompt_prefix='\n-> ')[source]
print_stack_trace()[source]
reset()[source]
setup(f, tb)[source]
sigint_handler(signum, frame)[source]
user_call(frame, argument_list)[source]

This method is called when there is the remote possibility that we ever need to stop in this function.

user_exception(frame, exc_info)[source]

This function is called if an exception occurs, but only if we are to stop at or just below this level.

user_line(frame)[source]

This function is called when we stop or break at this line.

user_return(frame, return_value)[source]

This function is called when a return trap is set here.

leo.external.edb.runeval(expression, globals=None, locals=None)[source]
leo.external.edb.runctx(statement, globals, locals)[source]
leo.external.edb.runcall(*args, **kwds)[source]
leo.external.edb.set_trace()[source]
leo.external.edb.post_mortem(t=None)[source]
leo.external.edb.help()[source]

ipy_leo Module

leoSAGlobals Module

leoSAGlobals.py: the stand-alone version of leo.core.leoGlobals.py

class leo.external.leoSAGlobals.Bunch(**keywords)[source]

Bases: object

A class that represents a colection of things.

Especially useful for representing a collection of related variables.

get(key, theDefault=None)[source]
ivars()[source]
keys()[source]
toString()[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.CheckVersion(s1, s2, condition='>=', stringCompare=None, delimiter='.', trace=False)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.CheckVersionToInt(s)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.adjustTripleString(s, tab_width)[source]

Remove leading indentation from a triple-quoted string.

This works around the fact that Leo nodes can’t represent underindented strings.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.angleBrackets(s)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.appendToList(out, s)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.bunch

alias of Bunch

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.callers(n=4, count=0, excludeCaller=True, files=False)[source]

Return a list containing the callers of the function that called callerList.

If the excludeCaller keyword is True (the default), callers is not on the list.

If the files keyword argument is True, filenames are included in the list.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.choose(cond, a, b)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.cls()[source]

Clear the screen.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.computeLeadingWhitespace(width, tab_width)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.computeWidth(s, tab_width)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.computeWindowTitle(fileName)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.convertPythonIndexToRowCol(s, i)[source]

Convert index i into string s into zero-based row/col indices.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.convertRowColToPythonIndex(s, row, col, lines=None)[source]

Convert zero-based row/col indices into a python index into string s.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.dictToString(d, tag=None, verbose=True, indent='')[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.doKeywordArgs(keys, d=None)[source]

Return a result dict that is a copy of the keys dict with missing items replaced by defaults in d dict.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.ensureLeadingNewlines(s, n)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.ensureTrailingNewlines(s, n)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.error(*args, **keys)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.es(*args, **keys)

Print all non-keyword args, and put them to the log pane. The first, third, fifth, etc. arg translated by translateString. Supports color, comma, newline, spaces and tabName keyword arguments.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.es_error(*args, **keys)

Print all non-keyword args, and put them to the log pane. The first, third, fifth, etc. arg translated by translateString. Supports color, comma, newline, spaces and tabName keyword arguments.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.es_exception(full=True, c=None, color='red')[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.es_exception_type(c=None, color='red')[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.es_print(*args, **keys)

Print all non-keyword args, and put them to the log pane. The first, third, fifth, etc. arg translated by translateString. Supports color, comma, newline, spaces and tabName keyword arguments.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.es_print_error(*args, **keys)

Print all non-keyword args, and put them to the log pane. The first, third, fifth, etc. arg translated by translateString. Supports color, comma, newline, spaces and tabName keyword arguments.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.es_print_exception(full=True, c=None, color='red')[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.es_trace(*args, **keys)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.escaped(s, i)[source]
class leo.external.leoSAGlobals.fileLikeObject(encoding='utf-8', fromString=None)[source]

Define a file-like object for redirecting writes to a string.

The caller is responsible for handling newlines correctly.

clear()[source]
close()[source]
flush()[source]
get()[source]
getvalue()
read()
readline()[source]
write(s)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.find_line_start(s, i)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.find_on_line(s, i, pattern)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.flattenList(theList)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.funcToMethod(f, theClass, name=None)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.getDocString(s)[source]

Return the text of the first docstring found in s.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.getDocStringForFunction(func)[source]

Return the docstring for a function that creates a Leo command.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.getLastTracebackFileAndLineNumber()[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.getLine(s, i)[source]

Return i,j such that s[i:j] is the line surrounding s[i]. s[i] is a newline only if the line is empty. s[j] is a newline unless there is no trailing newline.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.getLineAfter(s, i)
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.getPythonEncodingFromString(s)[source]

Return the encoding given by Python’s encoding line. s is the entire file.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.getWord(s, i)[source]

Return i,j such that s[i:j] is the word surrounding s[i].

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.get_leading_ws(s)[source]

Returns the leading whitespace of ‘s’.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.get_line(s, i)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.get_line_after(s, i)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.isBytes(s)[source]

Return True if s is Python3k bytes type.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.isCallable(obj)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.isChar(s)[source]

Return True if s is a Python2K character type.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.isMacOS()[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.isString(s)[source]

Return True if s is any string, but not bytes.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.isUnicode(s)[source]

Return True if s is a unicode string.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.isValidEncoding(encoding)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.isWordChar(ch)[source]

Return True if ch should be considered a letter.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.isWordChar1(ch)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.is_c_id(ch)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.is_nl(s, i)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.is_special(s, i, directive)[source]

Return True if the body text contains the @ directive.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.is_ws(c)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.is_ws_or_nl(s, i)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.joinLines(aList)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.joinlines(aList)
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.listToString(aList, tag=None, sort=False, indent='', toRepr=False)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.makeDict(**keys)[source]

Returns a Python dictionary from using the optional keyword arguments.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.match(s, i, pattern)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.match_c_word(s, i, name)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.match_ignoring_case(s1, s2)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.match_word(s, i, pattern)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.maxStringListLength(aList)[source]

Return the maximum string length in a list of strings.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.note(*args, **keys)[source]
class leo.external.leoSAGlobals.nullObject(*args, **keys)[source]

An object that does nothing, and does it very well.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.oldCheckVersion(version, againstVersion, condition='>=', stringCompare='0.0.0.0', delimiter='.')[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.optimizeLeadingWhitespace(line, tab_width)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.os_path_abspath(path)[source]

Convert a path to an absolute path.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.os_path_basename(path)[source]

Return the second half of the pair returned by split(path).

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.os_path_dirname(path)[source]

Return the first half of the pair returned by split(path).

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.os_path_exists(path)[source]

Return True if path exists.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.os_path_expandExpression(s, **keys)[source]

Expand {{anExpression}} in c’s context.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.os_path_expanduser(path)[source]

wrap os.path.expanduser

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.os_path_finalize(path, **keys)[source]

Expand ‘~’, then return os.path.normpath, os.path.abspath of the path.

There is no corresponding os.path method

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.os_path_finalize_join(*args, **keys)[source]

Do os.path.join(*args), then finalize the result.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.os_path_getmtime(path)[source]

Return the modification time of path.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.os_path_getsize(path)[source]

Return the size of path.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.os_path_isabs(path)[source]

Return True if path is an absolute path.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.os_path_isdir(path)[source]

Return True if the path is a directory.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.os_path_isfile(path)[source]

Return True if path is a file.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.os_path_join(*args, **keys)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.os_path_normcase(path)[source]

Normalize the path’s case.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.os_path_normpath(path)[source]

Normalize the path.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.os_path_realpath(path)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.os_path_split(path)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.os_path_splitext(path)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.os_startfile(fname)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.pause(s)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.pdb(message='')[source]

Fall into pdb.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.pr(*args, **keys)[source]

Print all non-keyword args, and put them to the log pane. The first, third, fifth, etc. arg translated by translateString. Supports color, comma, newline, spaces and tabName keyword arguments.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.prettyPrintType(obj)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.printDict(d, tag='', verbose=True, indent='')
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.printList(aList, tag=None, sort=False, indent='')
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.printStack()
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.print_dict(d, tag='', verbose=True, indent='')[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.print_list(aList, tag=None, sort=False, indent='')[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.print_obj(obj, tag=None, sort=False, verbose=True, indent='')[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.print_stack()[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.removeBlankLines(s)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.removeExtraLws(s, tab_width)[source]

Remove extra indentation from one or more lines.

Warning: used by getScript. This is not the same as adjustTripleString.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.removeLeading(s, chars)[source]

Remove all characters in chars from the front of s.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.removeLeadingBlankLines(s)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.removeLeadingWhitespace(s, first_ws, tab_width)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.removeTrailing(s, chars)[source]

Remove all characters in chars from the end of s.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.removeTrailingWs(s)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.reportBadChars(s, encoding)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.scanf(s, pat)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.shortFileName(fileName)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.shortFilename(fileName)
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.skip_blank_lines(s, i)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.skip_c_id(s, i)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.skip_id(s, i, chars=None)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.skip_leading_ws(s, i, ws, tab_width)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.skip_leading_ws_with_indent(s, i, tab_width)[source]

Skips leading whitespace and returns (i, indent),

  • i points after the whitespace
  • indent is the width of the whitespace, assuming tab_width wide tabs.
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.skip_line(s, i)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.skip_long(s, i)[source]

Scan s[i:] for a valid int. Return (i, val) or (i, None) if s[i] does not point at a number.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.skip_matching_c_delims(s, i, delim1, delim2, reverse=False)[source]

Skip from the opening delim to the matching delim2.

Return the index of the matching ‘)’, or -1

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.skip_matching_python_delims(s, i, delim1, delim2, reverse=False)[source]

Skip from the opening delim to the matching delim2.

Return the index of the matching ‘)’, or -1

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.skip_matching_python_parens(s, i)[source]

Skip from the opening ( to the matching ).

Return the index of the matching ‘)’, or -1

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.skip_nl(s, i)[source]

Skips a single “logical” end-of-line character.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.skip_non_ws(s, i)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.skip_pascal_braces(s, i)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.skip_to_char(s, i, ch)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.skip_to_end_of_line(s, i)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.skip_to_start_of_line(s, i)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.skip_ws(s, i)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.skip_ws_and_nl(s, i)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.splitLines(s)[source]

Split s into lines, preserving the number of lines and the endings of all lines, including the last line.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.splitlines(s)

Split s into lines, preserving the number of lines and the endings of all lines, including the last line.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.stripBlankLines(s)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.stripBrackets(s)[source]

Same as s.lstrip(‘<’).rstrip(‘>’) except it works for Python 2.2.1.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.toEncodedString(s, encoding='utf-8', reportErrors=False)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.toGuiIndex(s, index)

Convert index to a Python int.

index may be a Tk index (x.y) or ‘end’.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.toPythonIndex(s, index)[source]

Convert index to a Python int.

index may be a Tk index (x.y) or ‘end’.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.toString(obj, tag=None, sort=False, verbose=True, indent='')[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.toUnicode(s, encoding='utf-8', reportErrors=False)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.toUnicodeFileEncoding(path)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.toUnicodeWithErrorCode(s, encoding, reportErrors=False)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.tr(s)

Return the translated text of s.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.trace(*args, **keys)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.translateArgs(args, d)[source]

Return the concatenation of s and all args,

with odd args translated.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.translateString(s)[source]

Return the translated text of s.

leo.external.leoSAGlobals.u(s)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.ue(s, encoding)[source]
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.virtual_event_name(s)
leo.external.leoSAGlobals.warning(*args, **keys)[source]

leoftsindex Module

leosax Module

Read .leo files into a simple python data structure with h, b, u (unknown attribs), gnx and children information. Clones and derived files are ignored. Useful for scanning multiple .leo files quickly.

class leo.external.leosax.LeoNode[source]

Bases: object

Representation of a Leo node. Root node has itself as parent.

IVariables:
children

python list of children

u

unknownAttributes dict (decoded)

h

headline

b

body text

gnx

node id

parent

node’s parent

path

list of nodes that lead to this one from root, including this one

UNL()[source]

Return the UNL string leading to this node

flat()[source]

iterate this node and all its descendants in a flat list, useful for finding things and building an UNL based view

node_pos_count(node)[source]

node_pos_count - return the position (index) and count of preceeding siblings with the same name, also return headline

Parameters:node (LeoNode) – node to characterize
Returns:h, pos, count
Return type:(str, int, int)
class leo.external.leosax.LeoReader(*args, **kwargs)[source]

Bases: xml.sax.handler.ContentHandler

Read .leo files into a simple python data structure with h, b, u (unknown attribs), gnx and children information. Clones and derived files are ignored. Useful for scanning multiple .leo files quickly.

IVariables:
root

root node

cur

used internally during SAX read

idx

mapping from gnx to node

in_

name of XML element we’re current in, used for SAX read

in_attr

attributes of element tag we’re currentl in, used for SAX read

path

list of nodes leading to current node

characters(content)[source]

collect body text and headlines

endElement(name)[source]

decode unknownAttributes when t element is done

startElement(name, attrs)[source]

collect information from v and t elements

leo.external.leosax.get_leo_data(source)[source]

Return the root node for the specificed .leo file (path or file)

lproto Module

stringlist Module

class leo.external.stringlist.SList[source]

Bases: list

List derivative with a special access attributes.

These are normal string lists, but with the special attributes:

.l: value as list (the list itself). .n: value as a string, joined on newlines. .s: value as a string, joined on spaces.
fields(*fields)[source]

Collect whitespace-separated fields from string list

Allows quick awk-like usage of string lists.

Example data (in var a, created by ‘a = !ls -l’)::
-rwxrwxrwx 1 ville None 18 Dec 14 2006 ChangeLog

drwxrwxrwx+ 6 ville None 0 Oct 24 18:05 IPython

a.fields(0) is [‘-rwxrwxrwx’, ‘drwxrwxrwx+’] a.fields(1,0) is [‘1 -rwxrwxrwx’, ‘6 drwxrwxrwx+’] (note the joining by space). a.fields(-1) is [‘ChangeLog’, ‘IPython’]

IndexErrors are ignored.

Without args, fields() just split()’s the strings.

get_list()[source]
get_nlstr()[source]
get_spstr()[source]
grep(pattern, prune=False, field=None)[source]

Return all strings matching ‘pattern’ (a regex or callable)

This is case-insensitive. If prune is true, return all items NOT matching the pattern.

If field is specified, the match must occur in the specified whitespace-separated field.

Examples:

a.grep( lambda x: x.startswith('C') )
a.grep('Cha.*log', prune=1)
a.grep('chm', field=-1)
l
n
s
sort(field=None, nums=False)[source]

sort by specified fields (see fields())

Example::
a.sort(1, nums = True)

Sorts a by second field, in numerical order (so that 21 > 3)

leo.external.stringlist.shcmd(cmd)[source]

Execute shell command, capture output to string list